24 Jun, 2021 01:21 PM

How do you keep yourself from falling asleep while studying?

In advance, this is a serious question, guys. I've never had this problem before until last semester, and I was a semi-wreck then. Now, again, I can't seem to open a book to study without dozing off. No matter where I am, or what I'm studying, I fall asleep: In my bed, at a desk or table, in the car (no, I'm not driving), on a couch, in the kitchen, on the floor, at a computer. Even at the library, during a lecture, in a waiting room, outside on a bench, and in the lobby. Aside from it being pretty embarrassing, I'm losing study time and I don't want to fall behind. The thing is, I -am- getting enough sleep these days and I actually really like studying, so I'm not quite sure what the problem is. Unless I'm just thinking about it too much, and if I stop thinking about it, it'll stop happening? Any advice? How do you keep yourself from falling asleep? Everyone's welcome to answer. I promise I'll stay awake while reading your responses.

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JE
24 Jun, 2021 01:21 PM

I don't know if you're able to concentrate on reading while other people are in the room, but if you can, give that a try. I tend to fall asleep when I'm sitting alone because everything is so quiet. I don't know how big your family is or even if you live at home but if you do try reading in the kitchen or another room where people will be in and out, your body will feel much less like it's sleep time.

Another suggestion, munch something while reading. This could get unhealthy, but if you stick to something like un-buttered popcorn it's not so bad for you. If you're chewing you're quite unlikely to fall asleep and your body will be in eating mode instead of sleeping mode. Do be careful with this though, because it could lead to you associating eating with reading and then eventually you'll get to the point where you feel hungry every time you read. >< A warm drink might help as well, but for some people that just makes them sleepier.

One more suggestion, take breaks every 15 min. I know that's a lot of breaks but just stop for a couple minutes, get up and walk around, stretch, do something mindless to give your brain a small rest as well. When you sit back down review in your head very quickly what you were reading before, and then begin where you left off - this is a good way to make sure you were paying attention to what you were reading as well.

Music or TV in the background likely wont help, music is easily ignored and the TV puts many people into a relaxed "curl up on the couch" mode that will easily lead to sleepiness.

If you are very abnormally sleepy you might want to take Angel's suggestion about getting check out for mono. Mono can be caught any number of ways including sharing a drink from the same glass with a friend who has (or had) it. One of the symptoms of mono is feeling very very sleepy all the time.

AN
24 Jun, 2021 01:21 PM

This Site Might Help You.

RE:

How do you keep yourself from falling asleep while studying?

In advance, this is a serious question, guys. I&#39;ve never had this problem before until last semester, and I was a semi-wreck then. Now, again, I can&#39;t seem to open a book to study without dozing off. No matter where I am, or what I&#39;m studying, I fall asleep: In my bed, at a desk or





FI
24 Jun, 2021 01:22 PM

My main suggestion would be to get some sleep. 

If you're having trouble devoting eight hours of your schedule to sawing logs, then that's your real problem. 

So get to sleep; it's only eight hours. You won't get addicted or nothing. C'mon, try it. Everyone's doing it. You wanna be cool doncha? You wanna fit in doncha?

I had the same problem when I switched to my semester two schedule. I had 8 o'clock classes 4 out of 5 days of the week, but I was still going to bed at 12 and waking up at 6am. I nearly failed my statistics course I was so sleepy. I would stare at the front of the room and just feel my eyes beginning to close. "I'm just gonna rest my eyes for a bit" And then I'd wake up staring at my lap with the whiteboard half-filled with equations.

I would also just black out while studying.

I got over it, though, by rolling my bedtime back to 9 o'clock. I felt stupid for it and mentally teased myself for having the same bedtime as an eight year old, but in the end it was worth it.

Now my eyes aren't blurry all the time, and I no longer feel the need to take flash naps in public. I'm cured and you can be too. Try the restorative power of sleep. It's been scientifically proven to... make you... happier. Or something.

Sleep: It's good for you.

If you want a quick fix. Well, there really is none. You can try high doses of caffeine and loud music, but it has been proven that well-rested individuals do retain knowledge better. Sleep is almost (if not just) as important as study when it comes to getting the grades. Trust me. Do you know how much I had to study for my statistics course just to make the grade? Of course not; you're not me. But if you were me, you'd know that catching some z's would have relieved a lot of pressure from your life.

It's always best to take the proactive solution.

Like they say, an ounce of prevention is equal to... I don't know what exactly; I'm more into metrics, but it's bigger than an ounce.








AM
24 Jun, 2021 01:22 PM

If your problem with being alert while reading your textbooks is not because of stress or lack of sleep then I would recommend seeing a doctor to check if there is a serious illness behind your sleepiness. If the doctor says that you are perfectly healthy , then I would recommend trying drink tea or coffee. Listen to music in the background to stimulate your nerves. If you can't absorb the information take a 10 minute walk to clear your head. Invite friends over to make a study group. Good luck on your up coming finals:)


















OS
24 Jun, 2021 01:22 PM

I stayed up till 3:00 last night studying...not kidding. What I did was I drank lots of water and adjusted my position a lot. Whatever you do, DON'T CONSUME SUGAR!! It will give you energy for a little bit but then you'll have a sugar crash and your body will feel even more tired than it would if you didn't consume the sugar.

It also helps to play some music. I listen to The Beatles when I'm studying at night and for some reason it helps me to stay awake. But this is just me. It is probably different for other people.